Web Design Strategy with Search engine marketing

The phrase “web design strategy means a range of different things to different people, and involves more than merely “design decisions. The term seems to imply that the issue is about color, page layout and the use of Flash animations. Yes, these factors are part of the big picture, but the “bigger picture is about the overall design of your website, meaning its entire “architecture.

You need to find out how your site’s overall “information architecture affects its visibility to search engines. The truth is, specific web page elements like your navigation scheme and technologies like CSS (Cascading Style Scripts) or JavaScript can either interfere with or aid a search engine’s ability to “spider and rate your site. Sometimes an element can do both, at the same time!

The whole topic of a “site architecture or web design strategy that supports Search Engine Marketing (SEM) has really been quite poorly addressed. Many companies that do SEM consulting have less than state-of-the-art knowledge of how information architecture and design strategy affect a site’s usability and organic rankings. If your consultant, or your own research, is focusing only on search advertising, media buys and bidding processes, you are not getting the whole picture.

A top position in the Google results is useless if site visitors aren’t being converted into buyers. A successful site architecture and site design strategy will address the needs of both the search engines and your visitors/customers.
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Google Page Rank And Alexa Rank

So, you’ve heard a few things about SEO and now you are trying to learn some more about what SEO actually is and what your goals actually are.  Well, your main two goals in SEO are to increase your websites position in the search engine results pages(SERP’s) and increase website traffic.  Google Pagerank represents how important your website is compared to all other websites and Alexa Rank is how many visitors your website gets in relation to all other websites on the Internet.  You are aiming to get a high Google Pagerank (commonly refered to as PR) and a low Alexa Rank.  What looking at these two measured elements does is give you some idea of how well, or how badly, your website is doing in comparison to all other websites.  Lets explore these two rankings in a little more detail.

What is Google Page Rank?

The co-founders of Google, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, describe Google Page Rank as a tool designed to rank a website that is listed in the Google search index.  A Pagerank of a web page is given on a scale of 0-10.  0 is the lowest possible score for a website and conversely a 10 is the highest score possible.  A high Pagerank is defined by the amount, importance(PageRank) and relevance of web pages that link to the web page in question.  When a web page links to another web page, Google consider that to be a vote for the page in question and therefore of some importance.  There is a formula associated to how PageRank is calculated but for the purposes of this article it is too indepth, but if you are interested in the theory behind PageRank (PR) then a quick search on Google will provide fruitful.

What is Alexa Rank?

The Alexa Rank is different to Google PR; Alexa rank websites based solely on traffic to the website.  Alexa rank websites in descending order towards 0, where the most highly visited website on the Internet is given a rank of 0.  At this point in time the top three ranked websites (most visitors) on Alexa are, 0 – Yahoo, 1 – Google and 2 – MySpace.  According to Alexa these 3 websites get the most traffic on the Internet.  Alexa Rankings vary from 1 to a billion.  Every web site in the world is included in the Alexa Rank, so the scale on your Alexa ranking is constantly changing in relation to other websites on the Internet.